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20130209
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
what was important in life. education being the primary importance and if i heard once i must have heard everyday in my childhood education opens the door of opportunity for you. it took me a while to realize that that's not the only thing it does for you. it also enriches you as a person. but she also taught me what i think the most important thing and that's to be caring about people. now, my mom didn't understand public service in the way that i've participated in it. sort of didn't lead community boards or lead -- >> rose: she probably didn't have time! >> she didn't. she was raising two kids and working six days a week and trying to survive. but she showed me what it meant to care about people. i detail in the book how my mother was a local nurse to the projects in the co-op city where we lived, how giving she was to everyone she's met. and i learned from her example that that was an important value in life to give to others. >> rose: did you also learn in your experience that you cannot do it alone? >> oh, gosh, that's what the whole book is about. it's how i stand on the sho
and authentic, we are not used easily to change. but it's been an amazing run so in education reform we have done something very different. health-care reform, we've done very different. government reorganization we've done differently. we've managed in a very short period of time to really try to maintain that authenticultu but actually try to find a new way to do business going forward. >> as you know when hurricane hit here it hit the northward with huge force. and so many people suffered so much. and questions were raised about race and other issues. where are you in rebuilding the northward? where are you in trying to, whatever those scars were, get them to heal. >> yes, well let me say this. the storm did not discriminate. this storm, and people ve a hard time envisioning this, really put the entire city underwater, not just the 9th ward. the lake view, again tilly, black neighborhood, white neighborhoods, old neighborhood, newer nab hoods got completely wiped. not every part of the city is back. and this is not a surprise. the best quote about it he said when it gets cold, the poor ge
stock of the fact we're not doing justice by our education system, by our infrastructure, by our research and development, by the policies that are needed to lift up the people of this country. and no government doesn't have to do everything. of course. we understand that. but you know, the idea of declaring the wealthiest few in the country, the job creators, well, the job creators are the people who either do or do not have money to go to the stores and purchase things and to for their families. and when they can't the economy sinks. >> rose: i want to talk about all of those, whether the digital revolution, but with washington we just had an election. >> yeah. >> rose: president obama re-elected. we see now some movement towards immigration reform. >> yeah. >> rose: because elections have results. >> yeah. >> and they realize the latino population have shown their electoral strength is that where change is going to come from? because politicians finally began notwithstanding the corporate power that you mentiod, and tnited decision by the supreme court, all of the things you r
of the things that was really important to me about the film was to show a type of education, you know that is equally valuable but completely different from what people normally see. >> rose: finally here is tony scott from the "new york times" on this program talking about your film, roll tape. >> tell me what it was that you saw in beasts of the southern wild. >> i saw an extraordinary energy and imaginative free do. i mean one thing that-- because it's an independent movie, a small scale, you know, low budget kind of seat of the pants production. and so many of the movies that have come out recently that fit that template are very kind of somber and grim and kind of literally realistic, and about sort of the missery and struggle of people in trouble. and this one was so magical, and so imaginative it had alof thatkind o, you know, social conscience and neorealist exploration but also this sense of really the only word i have is magic. and it went, it kind of invented this world and got so wonderfulfully inside the consciousness of this child, you know t reminded me of the first tim
is actionable. it's not. some things are just educational. we did two interviews on last night's "mad money." the first one was not actionable. the first one was sandy cutler. didn't produce anything you could act on because the stock had run up a couple of bucks. he did mention that china's getting better. we've got to file that away for the next opportunity to play china. david pyatt, total gold rush. you see, he explained to us that allergan has not just one new drug, but the possibility of a second blockbuster, an inhaled migraine fighter that his company now owns 100% of thanks to the pending purchase of mac pharmaceuticals. well, the interview broke no news, kind of like, you know, breaking news thing, it did produce something i felt that was better. a more pertinent impression, which was that pyatt's allergan's ever conservative ceo. always really conservative. when i said if i read the tea leaves right, the fact he guided analysts higher, not lower this time meant he was more bullish than usual. his readiness to agree with that. this is a conservative guy. the readiness gave you a f
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)